On Oct. 2, 1985, Tim Weaver joined the Lewisville Fire Department. He worked his way through multiple roles before becoming captain. More than three decades later, because of an injury to his Achilles’ tendon, Weaver had to retire.

Listen to audio from Weaver’s last call

“I’m still kind of shellshocked that it’s actually here,” Weaver said of his retirement. “Just hearing those sirens go off, it’s like the call of the wolf… you hear that noise and you feel like you should be going.”

After “31 years and some change” of fighting fires, Weaver retired on Dec. 31, 2016. On Jan. 5 the department held his retirement ceremony at the central station. The station bay was full of family, friends, coworkers, neighbors and members of his church.

Tim Weaver inspects his crew one final time before his retirement ceremony. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)
Tim Weaver inspects his crew one final time before his retirement ceremony. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)

Weaver has served Lewisville in various roles. He was a firefighter, EMT, paramedic, driver and captain with LFD.

He was also a member of the original dive team when it was a volunteer position performed off-duty. Training and equipment were out-of-pocket expenses. Yet he saw a need to fill that role because his aunt, Linda Roberts, drowned in Eagle Mountain Lake when he was younger.

“I just saw a need for people that had loved ones who drowned,” he said. “I still get goosebumps thinking about when they sounded those horns after they found [my aunt].”

Chief Tim Tittle, who has worked alongside Weaver for the captain’s entire career with Lewisville, said he is extremely passionate and hard-working, both out on emergency calls and in the station.

Weaver has a background in construction, Tittle said, and would always be one of the first people to volunteer in remodeling projects within the department. He said Weaver has contributed his skills to just about every station in the department, cutting expenses for taxpayers.

“If readers are citizens of this community, they need to know that he gave 31 years of his life to help serve this community in any shape or form that was needed,” Tittle said.

Tittle said Weaver was there for his co-workers when he was off-duty too, visiting them when they were injured or ill, helping them with work around the house. He spent more than the 24 hours on every third day caring for his brothers at the department.

“Something that others can model after him is the fact that he wasn’t just there, this wasn’t just a job for him,” Tittle said. “It was more of a calling.”

Tim Weaver holds his grandson Carter close as his coworkers tell the crowd of his accomplishments at the Lewisville Fire Department. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)
Tim Weaver holds his grandson Carter close as his coworkers tell the crowd of his accomplishments at the Lewisville Fire Department. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)

Weaver said he plans to stay pretty busy in his retirement. He has several commitments at First Baptist of Lewisville. On Thursdays he volunteers for Oasis, a group that gives caregivers a day off by entertaining and watching their Alzheimer’s patients.

On Sunday evenings he leads a small group, which consists of those who are dealing with the death of a loved one. Weaver checks up on the members of his group throughout the week. He is also a deacon at the church and a member of the choir, which practices every night.

Jimmy Bryan, the missions minister at First Baptist of Lewisville, said Weaver has devoted his whole life to others. 

“I’ve seen his service not only in the community but everywhere I go,” Bryan said. 

The two have been on mission trips to Guatemala together. Bryan said Weaver used his vacation time to go on the missions.

Bryan has known Weaver for about 15 years. Even though Weaver enjoys doing hands-on work and construction, he’ll do whatever is needed.

“I remember one day, I said, ‘Hey Tim, I really need your help with [Vacation Bible School]. I need somebody to watch the little babies,’” Bryan said. “Without missing a beat, he smiled and said, ‘I can’t wait to do that. I’ll do whatever you need me to do.’”

During Weaver’s career at the Lewisville Fire Department, he had three back surgeries, both knees “scoped” and replaced, both hips replaced, shoulder surgery and a screw put into his foot, he said. Knee arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves insertion of a camera that allows doctors to view the knee joint without a large incision.

After each injury and surgery, Weaver concentrated on recovering so he could return to work at Station 4 as quickly as possible.

His most recent injury, a torn Achilles’ tendon, forced him to retire over half a year earlier than planned.

“I was going to retire July 31 when I turned 62,” Weaver said. “I decided to give myself a birthday gift and retire on my birthday. That fell through.”

Grandchildren, from left, Dahlia, Eden, David and Carter watch Tim "Papaw" Weaver inspect his crew one final time. Next to Carter stands Lisa Weaver and her son Paul Jacob. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)
Grandchildren, from left, Dahlia, Eden, David and Carter watch Tim “Papaw” Weaver inspect his crew one final time. Next to Carter stands Lisa Weaver and her son Paul Jacob. (Photo by Christina Ulsh)

Wife Lisa Weaver, who he met in 1988 at the fire department when she worked there, was holding the door for her husband when he ripped the back-side of his left foot on the evening of Nov. 21.

“He was coming in the back door and tripped over the threshold of the door coming into our den,” she said. “He just tripped and had to catch himself, had to brace himself with that leg. Instantly there was something wrong. We knew something was wrong the minute he landed on that foot.”

Tim Weaver said he hoped the doctors would fix his tendon but he had exhausted his sick time when he got his hips replaced in 2015.

“There’s some disappointment, but you know I’m abundantly blessed. I have no complaints,” he said.

Lisa Weaver said she thinks the retirement could be hard for him but he’s the type of person who tackles anything and makes the best of it. She said she is confident he will adjust.

“It’s something that he’s going to miss. He already misses it, every time he hears the siren,” she said.